The First Guitarist Mötley Crüe’s Mick Mars Admired

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Mötley Crüe is known to be one of the most ethically controversial rock and roll bands in music history. Their lifestyle and parties have always been a topic of scandalous headlines, and the members Nikki Sixx, Tommy Lee, and Vince Neil always did something that would contribute to their notorious reputation. However, rock fans loved their music and their mind-blowing concerts during their peak years.

Their fourth member Mick Mars was a bit older than the rest of the crew. He is seen as the mature one among them, solely focusing on his music and not getting dragged away by the party life as much as his bandmates. The fans have always considered him the quiet one and often as a person who disapproved of his bandmates’ childish actions. Mars has stuck with the band since 1980 and is still an important figure for Mötley Crüe with his guitar skills. Today we’ll unveil who inspired Mars to play the guitar and influenced the techniques that brought upon him this glamorous career.

Who Is Mick Mars’ Favorite Guitar Player?

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In 2017, Mars named Michael Bloomfield as his all-time favorite guitarist. He stated that Bloomfield was his first real ‘blues guy,’ and he influenced him in many ways, including bending strings. Unfortunately, he passed away in 1981 at 37 because of a drug overdose, but Mars has not forgotten him until this day.

Bloomfield was known to be one of the first superstars in the 1960s. He strongly influenced his contemporaries with his instrumentals and didn’t start singing until the ’70s. He is on Rolling Stone’s list of 100 greatest guitarists of all time at the 23rd spot. In 2015, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a part of Paul Butterfield Blues Band, but he sadly didn’t get to see it.

Here is what Mick Mars said about Bloomfield in 2017:

“My very first favorite guitarist ever – and he’s still one of my favorites. He influenced me so much. He was my first real blues guy because I was sitting around playing Ventures and stuff like that. But it wasn’t until Michael Bloomfield came around that I learned to bend strings.

After Electric Flag, he turned to more country kind of stuff, and that’s when I started losing interest. And then the next thing I know, he had died.

Arts and music is such an industry that everyone can be inspired and influenced by each other’s style and techniques. Although most guitar players state iconic names as Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix, or Eddie Van Halen as their ultimate idols, Mick Mars decided to go for an unusual name and reminded the world how much of a legend Michael Bloomfield is.