Perry Farrell Discusses The Breakups In Jane’s Addiction

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Jane’s Addiction lead singer Perry Farrell spoke to Heavy Consequence and opened up about departures, breakups, and hiatus that occurred for various reasons. The frontman emphasized these problems and benefits for them over the years by giving some real-life examples about them.

Since the band first stepped onto the rock stage, they gained great fame and commercial success in a short time thanks to Farrell’s and the members’ talents as musicians. However, it didn’t stop the issues between bandmates and even caused more trouble. They decided to break up because of the band members’ addiction problems, especially Eric Avery and Dave Navarro’s wish to leave Jane’s Addiction in late 1991.

Fortunately, they reunited with Navarro a few years later, and RHCP’s Flea also joined them when Avery didn’t want to play with them. However, in 2008, the former bassist returned to Jane’s Addiction, and the lineup consisted of Avery, Navarro, Farrell, and Stephen Perkins. Along with these departures and reunions, the band had previously worked with notable names like Matt Chaikin, Martyn LeNoble, and Duff McKagan.

Therefore, the host wanted to know whether those lineup changes and breakups affected their musical journey and productivity. Farrell defined them as ‘brakes,’ so sometimes they needed to hit the brakes and stop. The singer chose to see these situations as opportunities to work with new musicians with different styles and gain other perspectives. He resembled those splits to pruning the bushes to make them grow better.

When asked if those breakups were necessary, Farrell said:

“Those brakes, kindly call them like that. We never intended on hitting the brakes, but it’s like driving a car on the freeway, and the next thing you know, the other guy in front of you stops, so you’re breaking. Things happened to us. We do things to people, get in trouble, and throw tantrums. But I like to look at it like this, and this puts a smile on my face, a great marijuana plant. You always have to top it. Then you get a bushy bud.”

You can watch the interview below.