Mick Jagger Reveals The Rolling Stones’ Trick To Separate Themselves From The Beatles

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The Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger talked about how they managed to differentiate themselves from The Beatles in the first episode of their ‘My Life As A Rolling Stone.’ The band’s lead guitarist Keith Richards added details about The Beatles members and their personalities.

One of the most famous rock bands in the world, The Beatles, was founded in 1960, and its iconic and most known lineup managed to create a legacy like no other during their tenure. The band had a significant influence on the youth and next-generation musicians. Their music includes different genres and styles, such as rock and roll, classical music, pop, hard rock, and many more.

Two years after them, another band, The Rolling Stones, appeared on the stage, which would become worldwide known, and their records would sell millions by hitting the charts. Thus, it was natural for rock music lovers and critics to compare them. In ‘My Life As A Rolling Stone,’ Jagger opened up about their manager Andrew Loog Oldham’s strategy to eliminate these comparisons.

Mick Jagger highlighted that Brian Epstein wanted The Beatles to look like the good boys of rock music, while Oldham wished them to create the opposite image. They needed to become nastier and dirtier, living on the edge, which would shape the definition of a rock star in time. Richards also stated that Epstein ‘cleaned’ them for their public image, but The Beatles icons were as crazy and filthy as the Rolling Stones members.

In Jagger’s words, he said:

“I think that Andrew very much liked to contrive the danger because he saw that, very cleverly, as a foil for The Beatles. Brian Epstein had sold them as these lovable scamps, so Andrew wanted us to be nastier, dirtier, and with more of an edge.”

Richards added:

“They got cleaned up by their manager to make them more palatable to the public. Otherwise, they were exactly the same as we were, filthy swine.

Though some still compare the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, their manager’s tactic worked out since many understand these two bands have nothing in common besides their success, fame, vision, and love for rock and roll.