Machine Gun Kelly Says Prince Left A Legacy Worth Fighting For While Sharing His Goals For The Future Of His Music

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Pop-punk musician Machine Gun Kelly opened up about the diversity and the constantly changing style in her music during an interview with KROQ’s Nicole Alvarez and stated that he’s trying to break the labels and stereotypes while doing that, his inspiration is the legendary musician Prince.

As many of you know, Machine Gun Kelly’s debut studio album was ‘Lace Up’ and it’s a hip hop album that was released on October 9, 2012. The album debuted at number 4 on the Billboard 200 and received generally positive reviews, making it quite clear that Machine Gun Kelly has a bright future in the hip hop world.

His following studio album ‘General Admission’ was also a hip hop album, however, when Machine Gun Kelly released his third studio album, the changes in his style started to show themselves as ‘Bloom‘ which was released on May 12, 2017, was leaning towards alternative hip hop and indie pop.

The next album, ‘Hotel Diablo‘ which was released on July 5, 2019, had an extra element as well as being a hip hop album, it is also a rap-rock album and the constant representation that Machine Gun Kelly’s musical style is going to be evolving with each album to come.

His most recent album, ‘Tickets to My Downfall’ is a pop-punk album including more guitar-driven and live instrument sound which is quite different than his previous albums. Machine Gun Kelly himself revealed that the reason behind the dominant guitar and instrument in the recording is to inspire a younger generation to learn guitar.

During a recent interview, Machine Gun Kelly opened up about his evolving music style and stated that his aspiration is to keep breaking the ‘molds’ when it comes to music and keep on changing. In addition to this, he stated that one of the legacies he’s looking up to and trying to fight for is the iconic musician Prince.

Here is what Machine Gun Kelly said:

When Prince passed, seeing that everything even in the ​’80s when maybe people were like, ​‘This doesn’t make any sense…’ seeing how it made so much sense in the years leading up to his death and the years after, that’s a legacy worth fighting for. It’s not gonna be easy, and I’m aware of that. I’m happy to keep breaking the mold.”

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